One Quart Magazine Weekly Playlist #23

The One Quart Magazine Playlist is a weekly selection of music picked by various One Quart contributors. It’s our take on what’s spinning on the office stereo. The playlist will be published every Monday.

The One Quart Magazine Playlist is a weekly selection of music picked by various One Quart contributors. It’s our take on what’s spinning on the office stereo. The playlist will be published every Monday.

Kaarlo Stauffer

Kaarlo Stauffer

One Quart Magazine Weekly Playlist #23
Aino Venna: Avaruus

This just stops the show. What a way to approach the dreaded Christmas album. Astrid Swan

A Tribe Called Quest: We The People….

A Tribe Called Quest are back after a loooong hiatus. Ville Kilpeläinen

Thee Oh Sees:  The Poem

Thee Oh Sees have quietly become one of the most influential band’s around (certainly as regards the psych-scene in a broader sense). Their latest album (and second of the year) An Odd Entrance is more of the same yet different again and ‘The Poem’ reveals a subtlety rarely heard before. Nick Triani

Mikhael Paskalev: Witness

Mikhael Paskalev’s ‘Witness’ offers enough energy and positivity to fill a whole album. Somewhat reminiscent of Of Montreal as if processed through an 1980’s viewfinder, ‘Witness’ is bubbly and frothy and enhanced by a great dynamic mix. The video keeps those energy levels pumping. Nick Triani

ECHO IS YOUR LOVE: Six-Month Night

Echo is your Love, probably one of the longest-functioning noise rock bands in Finland, quietly put out a new 7″ this year. Here, the band is getting back to basics. The band’s penchant for disaffection has not diminished a bit and at will they’re as noisy as ever, a fact they aptly demonstrated this past Friday onstage at Lepakkomies, sounding better than ever. Having spent time as the most emotionally vital, consistent and relevant DIY indie-rock outfit Helsinki has had to offer, EIYL are truly back in the game. Don’t expect to see them live again anytime soon though. These cats take their time. Joel Kupiainen

Cory Hanson: Ordinary People

I’ve been quietly hypnotized by Cory Hanson’s album The Unborn Capitalist From Limbo. If Arthur Lee and really beautiful music are your thing (it’s certainly mine) then check it out. ‘Ordinary People’ is the first single from the album which dropped last Friday via the always reliable Drag City. Nick Triani

Jim James: Same Old Lie

The My Morning Jacket frontman Jim James is back with his second solo album Eternally Even. James slightly steps aside from MMJ classic rock and power pop to delve even further into his soul and funk leanings with an extra measure of the best pop sensibilities. Fiacha Harrington.

Brittany Howard and Jim James: I Want It That Way

Jim James shows off that he has plenty of pop chops as he performs a cover of Backstreet Boys‘ ‘I Want It That Way’ with Brittany Howard of Alabama Shakes. Fiacha Harrington.

The band’s penchant for disaffection has not diminished a bit and at will they’re as noisy as ever

Kaarlo Stauffer

Kaarlo Stauffer

My Morning Jacket: Compound Fracture

‘Compound Fracture’ is one of the highlights from My Morning Jacket’s Waterfall album from last year. Fiacha Harrington

My Morning Jacket: Rocket Man

This cover sees My Morning Jacket take on Elton John‘s classic ‘Rocket Man’, it’s a great fit. Fiach Harrington

Joanna Newsom: Leaving The City

Right now we need angels and harp music. Astrid Swan

Philip Glass: Lightning

Philip Glass goes “pop”. Kaarlo Stauffer.

Supertramp: Breakfast in America

I’m missing a specific breed of mega bands from the 70’s/80’s: proggy (and sometimes a bit silly), bands with great tunes and albums that sound like a million bucks. Supertramp had all of this. I mean, check out that clarinet solo! Ville Kilpeläinen

Rickie Lee Jones: Young Blood

Rickie Lee Jones first album is a last call for the 1970s singer songwriter tropes. The album was released when the New Wave was already in place. As a swan song (and before the snare drums got wetter and more gated) it’s a beautiful-beatnik LA adventure. “They say this city will make you dirty, but you look alright” Right on. Nick Triani

As a swan song (and before the snare drums got wetter and more gated) it’s a beautiful-beatnik LA adventure.

Kaarlo Stauffer - On My Stereo image

Kaarlo Stauffer

Mose Allison: If you’re goin’ to the city

The wonderful jazzbo Mose Allison died last week. Here’s a slice of sardonic social commentary which is sadly as relevant today as it was in 1965. Billy Brentford

Mose Allison: Your Mind Is On Vacation

It’s daunting the level of talent in the creative fields that have passed away this year. RIP Mose. Nick Triani

Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings: Stranger to My Happiness

Thanks for your soul Sharon. Astrid Swan

John Frusciante: Ramparts

John Frusciante was ahead of his time in 2001 when Vincent Gallo directed clips for every track on the To Record Only Water for Ten Days album. This was before YouTube existed, and now that there is a platform to spread these videos, ironically they keep on disappearing from the service. There seems to be no official channels uploading them. Perhaps it has something to do with Gallo, whose music videos seem to be missing from YouTube as well. The songs and the videos are magical and would deserve a bigger audience. Ville Kilpeläinen

Here’s a slice of sardonic social commentary which is sadly as relevant today as it was in 1965

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Kaarlo Stauffer

Bette Midler: Superstar

Leon Russell was one of those underrated and versatile songwriters, shifting between genres with ease. His ‘Superstar’ was popularized by the Carpenters, but I have a soft spot for a young Bette Midler’s schmaltzy, Streisandesque version. The power of the song remains. RIP Leon. Nick Triani

The Walker Brothers: Stay With Me Baby

Bette Midler famously sung ‘Stay With Me Baby’ at the end of The Rose. Lorraine Ellison‘s version remains imperial, whilst Terry Reid and Steve Marriott also cut fine interpretations. But this could be the Walker Brothers finest moment and certainly one of Scott’s great vocals. Hit play over and over again. Nick Triani

Michael Nyman: Fish Beach

A beautiful and peaceful little moment from the Peter Greenaway movie Drowning by Numbers. Kaarlo Stauffer.

Michael Nyman: The Kiss (featuring Dagmar Krause)

A collaborative piece by postmodern composer Michael Nyman and german singer Dagmar Krause (Henry Cow, Art Bears, Slapp Happy). Kaarlo Stauffer.

I’m missing a specific breed of mega bands from the 70’s/80’s: proggy (and sometimes a bit silly), bands with great tunes and albums that sound like a million bucks

 

This week’s selections from: Kaarlo Stauffer, Nick Triani, Ville Kilpeläinen, Billy Brentford, Astrid Swan, Joel Kupiainen and Fiacha Harrington.

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