Personal Style

Following on from their Indie Music Style features, Fiacha Harrington discusses personal style with Nick Triani. Triani, 50, is a music professional and OQM editor who grew up in London but now lives and works in Helsinki.

Following on from their Indie Music Style features, Fiacha Harrington discusses personal style with Nick Triani. Triani, 50, is a music professional and OQM editor who grew up in London but now lives and works in Helsinki.

Tytti Roto

Tytti Roto

Fiacha Harrington: So what are you wearing today? And what do you like to wear?

Nick Triani: Nowadays I get clothes given to me a lot. This shirt I’m wearing was passed onto me when my brother in-law passed away last year. My sister gave me a bunch of his shirts. He had all these Paul Smith, Prada and other designer shirts, and they are very nice, something that I wouldn’t have thought of wearing (or buying) but they fit me and look good – I can just throw on something scruffy with them. I still buy vintage stuff if I can find it. It might not be old but I tend to look for stuff that isn’t quite so modern looking when shopping for new clothes. I also try to dress as comfortably as possible.

Triani, early 1980's

Triani, early 1980’s

FH: What brands are you into?

NT: I could say I’ve never been so into brands. Alternatively, as I’ve gotten older I have discovered some brands I can tolerate. I used to buy Vans in the mid 90s and I loved wearing them and they were really comfortable. I picked a new pair up in the States last fall (after a long time not wearing Vans, and now love them all over again). Clarks shoes (especially Originals) have become essential for me. I still look for stuff that is old. I love to buy old coats, like I am wearing now. I hate to say it as I never thought of myself as being into ‘that’ look, but I have bought a lot of Tommy Hilfiger over the years; I have loads of Tommy Hilfiger coats, chinos, jumpers etc.

Triani late 1980s (second from right)

FH: What does style mean to you?

NT: I think it has to be something personal and individualistic. I believe style is something you just can’t pick up off a rack. I certainly feel I’ve tried to cultivate my own style (however vain that sounds). Wherever I’ve lived I felt I’ve looked different to everyone else I know, I haven’t quite fitted in. I do care more how I look nowadays than I used to in some sense. The opposite to that is that it was easier to appear stylish when I was leaner and younger looking (laughs).

Nick Triani, Oct. 2016

Nick Triani, Oct. 2016

FH:What do you think of fashion these days?

NT: Everything is so fragmented now, it feels like there is no NOW.  Hip-hop style is very ubiquitous. I think that is a style that has crossed into the mainstream and is kinda the predominant thing (certainly amongst the hipster fraternity in Helsinki).

It’s weird to see so many people I know dressing like rappers and diving superficially deep into that culture. I don’t see much of a personal take on that, it’s very much branding hitting the ceiling

It’s weird to see so many people I know dressing like rappers and diving superficially deep into that culture. I don’t see much of a personal take on that, it’s very much branding hitting the ceiling. Post-normcore, the 1990’s fashions seem to be alarmingly popular too, so I’m getting used to this period of people on the high street dressing badly with no sense of style (laughs).

Nick Triani, selection of Clarks

Nick Triani, selection of Clarks

Article was written by

  • Fiacha

    Fiacha Harrington, I am freelance writer and editor living in Helsinki. My goal at One Quart magazine is to write on a broad spectru...

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